t h e l i b r a r y o f t i b e t a n c l a s s i c s result as the path Core Teachings of the Sakya Lamdré Tradition Translated by Cyrus Stearns - PDF

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t h e l i b r a r y o f t i b e t a n c l a s s i c s taking the result as the path Core Teachings of the Sakya Lamdré Tradition Translated by Cyrus Stearns A Note from the Publisher We hope you will enjoy

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t h e l i b r a r y o f t i b e t a n c l a s s i c s taking the result as the path Core Teachings of the Sakya Lamdré Tradition Translated by Cyrus Stearns A Note from the Publisher We hope you will enjoy this Wisdom book. For your convenience, this digital edition is delivered to you without digital rights management (DRM). This makes it easier for you to use across a variety of digital platforms, as well as preserve in your personal library for future device migration. Our nonprofit mission is to develop and deliver to you the very highest quality books on Buddhism and mindful living. We hope this book will be of benefit to you, and we sincerely appreciate your support of the author and Wisdom with your purchase. If you d like to consider additional support of our mission, please visit our website at wisdompubs.org. Taking the Result as the Path The Library of Tibetan Classics is a special series being developed by The Institute of Tibetan Classics aimed at making key classical Tibetan texts part of the global literary and intellectual heritage. Eventually comprising thirty-two large volumes, the collection will contain over two hundred distinct texts by more than a hundred of the bestknown Tibetan authors. These texts have been selected in consultation with the preeminent lineage holders of all the schools and other senior Tibetan scholars to represent the Tibetan literary tradition as a whole. The works included in the series span more than a millennium and cover the vast expanse of classical Tibetan knowledge from the core teachings of the specific schools to such diverse fields as ethics, philosophy, psychology, Buddhist teachings and meditative practices, civic and social responsibilities, linguistics, medicine, astronomy and astrology, folklore, and historiography. Taking the Result as the Path The tradition known as the Path with the Result or Lamdré (lam bras) is the most important tantric system of theory and meditation practice in the Sakya school of Tibetan Buddhism. This volume contains an unprecedented compilation of eleven vital works from different periods in the history of the Path with the Result in India and Tibet. The Vajra Lines of the great Indian adept VirÒpa (ca. seventh eighth centuries) is the basic text of the tradition and is said to represent the essence of all the Buddhist tantras in general and the Hevajra Tantra in particular. Sachen Künga Nyingpo s ( ) Explication of the Treatise for Nyak is a fundamental commentary on VirÒpa s succinct work and is among the earliest texts written in Tibet to explain VirÒpa s mystical words. The collection of six writings by Jamyang Khyentsé Wangchuk ( ) includes a definitive history of the tradition and detailed explanations of its meditation practices as taught by his great master, Tsarchen Losel Gyatso ( ). A supplement to Khyentsé s history, written in the nineteenth century by Künga Palden and completed by Jamyang Loter Wangpo ( ) in the early twentieth century, tells the stories of later masters in the lineage. An instruction manual composed by the Fifth Dalai Lama ( ) completes the unfinished work of Khyentsé Wangchuk. The volume concludes with a summation of all the teachings. Mangthö Ludrup Gyatso ( ), another of Tsarchen s principal Dharma heirs, composed this brief and eloquent text. Most of these writings traditionally have been considered to be of a secret nature. The present translation has been made with the personal approval and encouragement of His Holiness Sakya Trizin, head of the Sakya tradition, and Chogyé Trichen Rinpoché, head of the Tsarpa branch of the Sakya tradition. t h e l i b r a r y o f t i b e t a n c l a s s i c s v o l u m e 4 Thupten Jinpa, General Editor Taking the Result as the Path Core Teachings of the Sakya Lamdré Tradition Translated and edited by Cyrus Stearns Foreword by H.H. Sakya Trizin Wisdom Publications Boston in association with the Institute of Tibetan Classics Wisdom Publications 199 Elm Street Somerville MA USA Institute of Tibetan Classics All rights reserved. First Edition No part of this book may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photography, recording, or by any information storage or retrieval system or technologies now known or later developed, without permission in writing from the publisher. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Taking the result as the path : core teachings of the Sakya lamdré tradition / translated and edited by Cyrus Stearns. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN (hardcover : alk. paper) 1. Lam-'bras (Sa-skya-pa) 2. Sa-skya-pa (Sect) Doctrines. I. Stearns, Cyrus, 1949 BQ T dc Cover & interior design by Gopa &Ted2, Inc. Plate on page 12: Detail from a thangka of four Lamdré lineage holders; Tibet, fifteenth century. (Tibet Collection: Barbara and Walter Frey, Zurich, F753) Message from the Dalai Lama The last two millennia witnessed a tremendous proliferation of cultural and literary development in Tibet, the Land of Snows. Moreover, due to the inestimable contributions made by Tibet s early spiritual kings, numerous Tibetan translators, and many great Indian pa itas over a period of so many centuries, the teachings of the Buddha and the scholastic tradition of ancient India s N land monastic university became firmly rooted in Tibet. As evidenced from the historical writings, this flowering of Buddhist tradition in the country brought about the fulfillment of the deep spiritual aspirations of countless sentient beings. In particular, it contributed to the inner peace and tranquillity of the peoples of Tibet, Outer Mongolia a country historically suffused with Tibetan Buddhism and its culture the Tuva and Kalmuk regions in present-day Russia, the outer regions of mainland China, and the entire trans-himalayan areas on the southern side, including Bhutan, Sikkim, Ladakh, Kinnaur, and Spiti. Today this tradition of Buddhism has the potential to make significant contributions to the welfare of the entire human family. I have no doubt that, when combined with the methods and insights of modern science, the Tibetan Buddhist cultural heritage and knowledge will help foster a more enlightened and compassionate human society, a humanity that is at peace with itself, with fellow sentient beings, and with the natural world at large. It is for this reason I am delighted that the Institute of Tibetan Classics in Montreal, Canada, is compiling a thirty-two volume series containing the works of many great Tibetan teachers, philosophers, scholars, and practitioners representing all major Tibetan schools and traditions. These important writings will be critically edited and annotated and will then be published in modern book format in a reference collection called The Library of Tibetan Classics, with their translations into other major languages to be followed later. While expressing my heartfelt commendation for this vi Taking the Result as the Path noble project, I pray and hope that The Library of Tibetan Classics will not only make these important Tibetan treatises accessible to scholars of Tibetan studies, but will create a new opportunity for younger Tibetans to study and take interest in their own rich and profound culture. Through translations into other languages, it is my sincere hope that millions of fellow citizens of the wider human family will also be able to share in the joy of engaging with Tibet s classical literary heritage, textual riches that have been such a great source of joy and inspiration to me personally for so long. The Dalai Lama The Buddhist monk Tenzin Gyatso Special Acknowledgments The Institute of Tibetan Classics expresses its deep gratitude to Claus Hebben for generously providing the entire funding for this translation project. We also acknowledge the Hershey Family Foundation for its generous support of the Institute of Tibetan Classics projects of compiling, editing, translating, and disseminating key classical Tibetan texts through the creation of The Library of Tibetan Classics. Contents Foreword by H.H. Sakya Trizin Note to the Reader General Editor s Preface xv xvii xix Translator s Introduction 1 Technical Note 9 Part I: Vajra Lines and Explication of the Treatise for Nyak Vajra Lines of the Path with the Result, by VirÒpa (ca. seventh eighth centuries) Explication of the Treatise for Nyak, by Sachen Künga Nyingpo ( ) 23 The Path of Samsara and Nirvana in Common 25 The Three Appearances 25 The Three Continua 27 The Four Authentic Qualities 47 The Six Oral Instructions 48 The Four Oral Transmissions 53 The Five Dependently Arisen Connections 54 Protection from Obstacles on the Path 54 The Mundane Path 61 A General Classification 61 The Brief Presentation of the Causes for the Arising of Meditative Concentration 63 An Extensive Presentation in a Condensed Form 83 x Taking the Result as the Path The Path Free from Hope and Fear 84 The Four Tests 87 The Four Applications of Mindfulness 87 The Four Perfect Renunciations 89 A Final Summary 93 The Transcendent Path 95 A General Classification 95 The Six Spiritual Levels of the Vase Initiation 96 The Four Spiritual Levels of the Secret Initiation 103 The Two Spiritual Levels of the Initiation of Primordial Awareness Dependent on an Embodiment of Wisdom 107 The Half Spiritual Level of the Fourth Initiation 114 The Result 121 A Condensed Presentation of the Treatise 124 The Conclusion 125 Part II: The Path with the Result According to the Explication for Disciples Expansion of the Great Secret Doctrine, Summarizing Notes on the History of the Oral Instructions, by Jamyang Khyentsé Wangchuk ( ) 129 The Origin of the Oral Instructions in the Noble Land of India 130 The Spread of the Excellent Dharma in General 131 The Specific Origin of the Precious Teaching 137 The Life of the Lord of Yogins 137 The Spread of the Oral Instructions in the Land of Tibet 155 The Spread of the Excellent Dharma in General 155 The Specific History of the Precious Teaching 163 The Initial Introduction of the Tradition by Lord Gayadhara 163 The Spread of the Tradition by Lord Drokmi and His Disciples in the Interim 168 Contents xi The Final Spread and Expansion of the Tradition by the Venerable Lords of Sakya, Father and Sons Blazing of a Hundred Brilliant Blessings: A Supplement to the Expansion of the Great Secret Doctrine, Summarizing Notes on the History of the Oral Instructions, by Künga Palden (nineteenth century) and Loter Wangpo ( ) Summarizing Notes on How to Explain and Practice the Dharma, by Jamyang Khyentsé Wangchuk ( ) 285 How to Explain and Learn the Dharma 287 The Identification of the Dharma to Be Explained 287 The Path 289 The Result 293 The Meaning of the Names of Both Together 293 The Oral Instructions That Explain the Dharma 294 The Four Authentic Qualities 294 The Four Oral Transmissions 298 How to Benefit Others After the Practice Has Been Perfected Summarizing Notes on the Path Presented as the Three Appearances, by Jamyang Khyentsé Wangchuk ( ) 319 Impure Appearance 338 The Faults of Samsara 338 The Difficulty of Gaining the Freedoms and Endowments 365 Reflection Upon the Causes and Results of Actions 370 Experiential Appearance 377 Cultivating Love 377 Cultivating Compassion 380 Cultivating the Enlightenment Mind 383 Calm Abiding 385 The Cultivation of Penetrating Insight 387 Pure Appearance 391 xii Taking the Result as the Path 7. Profound Summarizing Notes 0n the Path Presented as the Three Continua, by Jamyang Khyentsé Wangchuk ( ) 395 The Ground the Fundamental Nature of the Phenomenon of Samsara 396 The Path The Precise Way to Meditate 399 Preserving the Sacred Commitments As the Ground 399 The Stages of Guiding the Person 400 Meditation on the View of the Indivisibility of Samsara and Nirvana in the Causal Continuum of the Universal Ground 400 A Brief Presentation by Means of the Three Aspects of Coemergence 401 An Extensive Explication by Means of the Three Key Points of Practice 428 Establishing that Appearances Are the Mind 429 Establishing that Mental Appearance Is Illusory 435 Establishing that the Illusory [Mind] Has No Self-Nature 439 An Extremely Extensive Explication by Means of the Three Continua 449 The Ground or Causal Continuum as the Indivisibility of Samsara and Nirvana 449 The Presentation of the Method Continuum as the Indivisibility of Samsara and Nirvana 455 The Resultant Indivisibility of Samsara and Nirvana Summarizing Notes on the Outer Creation Stage, by Jamyang Khyentsé Wangchuk ( ) 477 The Vase Initiation 480 The Path: the Creation Stage 480 The Outer Creation Stage 480 The View: the Three Essences 509 The Culmination of Attainment as the Indivisibility of Samsara and Nirvana 511 Contents xiii The Practice When Passing Away 512 The Intermediate State Summarizing Notes on the Inner Creation Stage, by Jamyang Khyentsé Wangchuk ( ) Summarizing Notes Beginning with the Dream Yoga of the Vase Initiation, by the Fifth Dalai Lama ( ) 539 Dream Yoga 540 The Secret Initiation 545 The Path 545 The View 557 The Culmination of Attainment 557 The Clear-light Practice When Passing Away 558 The Intermediate State 558 The Dream Yoga 559 The Initiation of Primordial Awareness Dependent on an Embodiment of Wisdom 559 The Path 560 The View 564 The Culmination of Attainment 564 The Practice When Passing Away 564 The Intermediate State 565 Dream Yoga 565 The Fourth Initiation 566 The Path 566 The View 568 The Culmination of Attainment 569 The Practice When Passing Away 569 The Intermediate State and Dream Yoga Heart of the Practice: A Synopsis of the Key Points of the Guidance Manuals of the Path with the Result, by Mangthö Ludrup Gyatso ( ) 573 xiv Taking the Result as the Path Appendixes 1. Table of Tibetan Transliteration Topical Outline of the Texts by Sachen Künga Nyingpo, Jamyang Khyentsé Wangchuk, Künga Palden and Loter Wangpo, and the Fifth Dalai Lama 613 Notes 631 Glossary 687 Bibliography 693 Index 709 About the Contributors 751 Foreword His Holiness Sakya Trizin Head of the Sakya Order of Tibetan Buddhism The pith instructions of the precious and profound Lamdré teachings were received by the great mah siddha VirÒpa directly from Vajra Nair tmy herself. Ever since then, they have passed down from master to disciple in an unbroken stream of transmission for well over a thousand years. These teachings were transmitted to Tibet by the great translator Drokmi Sh kya Yeshé. The term lamdré means path and result. This term indicates that this sacred system of teachings encapsulates the core Sakya philosophy and practices resulting in the realization of the indivisibility of samsara and nirvana. This indivisibility means that the very samsaric appearances that we experience now themselves transform into the pure appearance of primordial wisdom. There is no impure form separate from what the realized noble ones experience. There is no pure form separate from what we experience. The same base is experienced and seen by different beings, therefore it is called the indivisibility of samsara and nirvana. This is the pinnacle of all the sutra and tantra teachings of Lord Buddha. If a practitioner of Buddhadharma receives the Lamdré teaching with pure motivation from a qualified master, with both master and disciple meeting all the prerequisites, then the Lamdré is a complete path for obtaining full enlightenment in one lifetime. A very important aspect of these secret pith instructions is that, from their beginning until now, they have been held in the greatest respect and have only been available to those whose mental continuum has been ripened through the relevant preliminary practices and initiations. Without such a base, esoteric teachings such as these cannot actually be comprehended. It is vitally important, both for the ripening of disciples and for the maintenance of the authenticity of the teachings, that this respect xvi Taking the Result as the Path and guardianship of these teachings continues in their transportation into the West. His Holiness the Dalai Lama has greatly emphasized and commended the work of those translating works from the vast and profound Buddhadharma. This is very important work, and I congratulate Cyrus Stearns and the Institute of Tibetan Classics for their motivation and dedicated effort in translating this most treasured teaching. May the availability of this translation support the turning of the wheel of Dharma for eons to come, spreading the glorious light of the precious teachings, so that all illusory appearances become the pure appearance of full enlightenment, liberating all sentient beings from all forms of suffering. Sakya Trizin December 2005 Note to the Reader Most of the texts translated in this book are of an esoteric nature. Traditionally, they have been studied and practiced in Tibet only by people who have received the teachings of the Path with the Result. Four of the texts the two historical works, the text that shows how to explain and practice the Dharma teachings, and the explanation of the Three Appearances are appropriate for anyone to read and study without preparation. The minimum traditional requirement for studying the remaining works is the complete Hevajra initiation. Optimally, the student will have received the entire teachings of the Path with the Result from a qualified teacher. The authors of the texts translated here intended them only for practitioners of the Path with the Result, and the tantric practices described in these works should never be attempted by anyone who has not been taught how to perform them correctly. For, according to tradition, good results cannot come from study and practice of Vajrayana teachings unless the student has first received the initiations and careful guidance that can only be received from a living master. These texts have been translated for The Library of Tibetan Classics only with the permission of H.H. Sakya Trizin, head of the Sakya tradition, and the encouragement of my teacher Chogyé Trichen Rinpoché, senior master of the Path with the Result and head of the Tsarpa lineage of the Sakya tradition. General Editor s Preface The publication of this volume brings a very special collection of Tibet s deeply spiritual literature into the world s literary heritage. This volume, Taking the Result as the Path: Core Teachings of the Sakya Lamdré Tradition, is volume 4 in The Library of Tibetan Classics, and contains some of the most important religious texts of the Tibetan Buddhist tradition translated for the first time ever in any secondary language. Selected under the guidance of His Holiness Sakya Trizin, the head of the Sakya school of Tibetan Buddhism, the texts in this volume constitute a comprehensive anthology of Lamdré (Path with the Result) teachings, the heart meditative tradition of the Sakya school. It is with deep respect and honor that the Institute of Tibetan Classics offers the translation of these precious texts to those who seek the path to spiritual awakening and to the world at large. Two primary objectives have driven the creation and development of The Library of Tibetan Classics. The first aim is to help revitalize the appreciation and the study of the Tibetan classical heritage within Tibetanspeaking communities worldwide. The younger generation in particular struggle with the tension between traditional Tibetan culture and the realities of modern consumerism. To this end, efforts have been made to develop a comprehensive yet manageable body of texts, one that features the works of Tibet s best-known authors and covers the gamut of classical Tibetan knowledge. The second objective of The Library of Tibetan Classics is to help make these texts part of global literary and intellectual heritage. In this regard, we have tried to make the English translation readerfriendly and, as much as possible, keep the body of the text free of scholarly apparatus, wh
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