Search Engine Users. Internet searchers are confident, satisfied and trusting but they are also unaware and naïve. - PDF

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Search Engine Users Internet searchers are confident, satisfied and trusting but they are also unaware and naïve. Embargoed for publication until 4pm, January 23, 2005 Deborah Fallows, PhD, Senior Research

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Search Engine Users Internet searchers are confident, satisfied and trusting but they are also unaware and naïve. Embargoed for publication until 4pm, January 23, 2005 Deborah Fallows, PhD, Senior Research Fellow PEW INTERNET & AMERICAN LIFE PROJECT 1615 L ST., NW SUITE 700 WASHINGTON, D.C Summary of Findings Internet users are very positive about their online search experiences. Search engines are highly popular among internet users. Searching the internet is one of the earliest activities people try when they first start using the internet, and most users quickly feel comfortable with the act of searching. Users paint a very rosy picture of their online search experiences. They feel in control as searchers; nearly all express confidence in their searching skills. They are happy with the results they find; again, nearly all report that they are usually successful in finding what they re looking for. And searchers are very trusting of search engines, the vast majority declaring that search engines are a fair and unbiased source of information. 84% of internet users have used search engines. On any given day, 56% of those online use search engines. 92% of those who use search engines say they are confident about their searching abilities, with over half of them, 52%, saying they re very confident. 87% of searchers say they have successful search experiences most of the time, including some 17% of users who say they always find the information for which they are looking. 68% of users say that search engines are a fair and unbiased source of information; 19% say they don t place that trust in search engines. Most searchers use search engines conservatively. Despite their positive feelings, few internet users are highly committed to searching. Most say they could walk away from search engines tomorrow and return to the traditional ways of finding information. About one third of users search on a daily basis, but most search infrequently, with almost half searching no more than a few times a week. Nearly all settle into a habit of using one or just a couple search engines, with only a very few searchers branching out to try more than three. 50% of searchers say they could go back to other ways of finding information; 32% say they can t live without search engines; and 17% say could let them go tomorrow. 47% of searchers will use a search engine no more than once or twice a week; 35% This Pew Internet & American Life Project report is based on the findings of a daily tracking survey on Americans' use of the Internet and an online survey about Internet health resources. All numerical data was gathered through telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates between May 14 and June 17, 2004, among a sample of 2,200 adults, aged 18 and older. For results based on the total sample, one can say with 95% confidence that the error attributable to sampling and other random effects is +/- 2%. For results based Internet users (n=1,399), the margin of sampling error is +/- 3%. Pew Internet & American Life Project, 1615 L St., NW, Suite 700, Washington, DC Summary of Findings of searchers will use a search engine at least once a day. 44% of searchers say they regularly use a single search engine, 48% will use just two or three, 7% will use more than three. Most internet users are naïve about search engines. While most consumers could easily identify the difference between TV s regular programming and its infomercials, or newspapers or magazines reported stories and their advertorials, only a little more than a third of search engine users are aware of the analogous sets of content commonly presented by search engines, the paid or sponsored results and the unpaid or organic results. Overall, only about 1 in 6 searchers say they can consistently distinguish between paid and unpaid results. This finding is particularly ironic, since nearly half of all users say they would stop using search engines if they thought engines were not being clear about how they present their paid results. Users do not object in principle to the idea that search engines will include paid results, but they would like them to be upfront and clear about the practice of presenting paid results. 38% of searchers are aware of a distinction between paid and unpaid results; 62% are not. 18% of searchers overall (47% of searchers who are aware of the distinction) say they can always tell which results are paid or sponsored and which are not. 70% of searchers are okay with the concept of paid or sponsored results. 45% of searchers would stop using search engines if they thought the engines weren t being clear about offering some results for pay. Experienced and sophisticated searchers cast a slightly more skeptical eye toward search engines than do average searchers. 65% of those with 6 or more years of online experience say search engines are a fair and unbiased source of information; 73% of others who have been online 5 years or less say so. 64% of those who use engines at least daily say search engines are a fair and unbiased source of information; 71% of those who use search engines less often say so. 63% of those who use more than 3 search engines say search engines are a fair and unbiased source of information; 69% of others say so. Internet Searchers - ii - Pew Internet & American Life Project Summary of Findings Internet users turn to search engines for both their important and their trivial questions. Over half of searchers say they split their searches among those for fun and those that are more important to them. We know from search logs that the most popular search terms are dominated by pop culture, news events, trends, and seasonal topics. These kinds of search terms constitute about half of what people search for; the other half are unique terms that reflect users diversity of idiosyncratic and special interests. 55% of searchers say about half the information they search for is important to them and half is trivial. 28% of searchers say most of the information they search for is important to them. 17% of searchers say most of the information they search for is trivial. There are some demographic differences among searchers: men and younger users are more plugged into the world of searching than women and older users. More men than women use search engines and are familiar with some of the controversial issues about search engines. Men search more frequently than women. They have a higher opinion of themselves as searchers than women do, despite being no more successful in finding what they re looking for. They also tend to stick more often to a single engine, while women have a few favorites. 88% of men who are internet users have used search engines. 79% of women who are internet users have used search engines. 40% of online men search at least daily, with 28% searching several times a day. 27% of women search at least daily, with 16% searching several times a day. 54% of online men say they are very confident in their search abilities. 40% of women say they are very confident in their search abilities. 43% of men have heard of the distinction between paid and unpaid results. 32% of women have heard of the distinction between paid and unpaid results. The youngest users, those years old, who have practically grown up with the internet, are more likely to be searchers. They search more often and are more confident about their search abilities. They also rely more on search engines and are more trusting and tolerant of them. 89% of internet users under 30 years have used search engines, compared to 85% of those years, 79% of those years, 67% of those over 65 years. Internet Searchers - iii - Pew Internet & American Life Project Summary of Findings 27% of internet users under 30 years use search engines several times a day, compared to 25% of those years; 15% of those years and 8 % of those over 65 years. 97% of internet users under 30 years express confidence in their search skills, compared to 93% of those years; 83% of those years and 79% of those over 65 years. 36% of internet users under 30 years say they couldn t live without search engines, compared to 35% for years, 26% of those years, and 18% of those over 65 years. 72% of internet users under 30 years say engine are fair and unbiased, compared to 68% of those years; 65% of those years, and 66% of those over 65 years. 74% of internet users under 30 years say it is fine for search engines to offer paid and unpaid results, compared to 71% of those years, 67% of those years and 60% of those over 65 years. Internet Searchers: Summary of Findings at a Glance Internet users are very positive about their online search experiences. Most searchers use search engines conservatively. Most searchers are naïve about search engines and search results. Internet users turn to search engines for both important and trivial questions. Men are more intense and savvy searchers than women. Young users are more avid, committed, and trusting searchers than older users. Source: Deborah Fallows. Search Engine Users. Washington, DC: Pew Internet & American Life Project, Jan., 2005 Internet Searchers - iv - Pew Internet & American Life Project Contents Summary of Findings Part 1. Introduction Part 2. What people seek with search engines Part 3. Who we are as searchers: confident and satisfied Part 4. The searcher and his search engine Part 5. Is users trust in search engines blind? Part 6. Some demographic differences: gender and age Part 7. Conclusions Methodology Internet Searchers - v - Pew Internet & American Life Project Part 1. Introduction Some 84% of adult internet users, about 108 million Americans, have used search engines to help them find information on the Web. Only the act of sending and receiving , with about 120 million users, eclipses searching in popularity as an internet activity. On an average day, about 68 million Americans, or about 53% of internet users, will go online. More than half of them, over 38 million people, will use a search engine. Again, second in popularity only to sending or receiving , searching is becoming a daily habit for about a third of all internet users. American internet users pose about 4 billion queries per month. Many of these include popular queries like Britney Spears or The Bible, and many others include unique search terms reflecting a user s personal interest or need. Popular search engines retrieve and index only a fraction of the countless tens of billions of pages on the Web. Google, the leader in sheer numbers, recently announced the company had doubled the number of their indexed pages to 8 billion; Microsoft indexes 5 billion; Yahoo is estimated to index about 4 billion, and AskJeeves about 2.3 billion pages. 1 Promises of more and more searchable data seem to emerge regularly, from searching local listings to searching inside books. There are hundreds, if not thousands, of search engines in the world, although just a few capture a high proportion of the audience. Users can search in a multitude of languages. While searchers vary dramatically in their habits, the average user spends a total of about 43 minutes a month conducting some 34 searches, viewing on average 1.9 pages per search. 2 The term average user belies the wide variety of styles among searchers: slightly more than one third of adults polled here, 35%, will conduct a search at least once a day, with the most enthusiastic of them, about two thirds of that group, searching at least several times a day. Roughly another third, 36%, searches less than daily but at least weekly. And just under a third, 29%, searches every few weeks or less. 1 cc1b9e9e&ei=5040&partner=moreover 2 comscore qsearch data from 127 million users, regardless of age, in September, Internet Searchers Pew Internet & American Life Project Part 2. What people seek with search engines Searchers turn to search engines for both important information and trivia. What kinds of searches are people doing? Are they turning to search engines for need-toknow information, or for trivia, or both? Most searchers, 55%, say they are as likely to look for information they consider important as for trivial information. Some 28% of searchers are more serious; they say they look mostly for information that is important to them. And 17% are more whimsical in their searching, using search engines mostly for information they don t consider important. About one in four internet users have searched for his own name on a search engine, just to see what comes up. More specifically, some 44% of users say that most or all the information they search for online is critical. It is information they absolutely need to find, for instance to accomplish an important task or answer an urgent question. About one quarter of those searchers say everything they search for is that critical. On the other hand, about one quarter of all searchers, 24%, say that very little of the information they search for is that important to them. A number of users describe their recent searches for important information 3 : I was asked about state labor laws -- timecards and the legal ramifications of paying only some of the time listed. Medical information for my son...it gave us some background information and a common ground to start asking questions about his condition. Conversely, 33% of searchers say they would not bother looking up most or even all of the information they search for if they lacked access to internet search engines. On the other extreme, about one quarter of searchers, 24%, say that very little of their searching is in pursuit of such trivia. Another user describes a recent search he considers expendable: 3 Comments from users come from an online survey conducted by the Pew Internet & American Life Project in May June, Internet Searchers Pew Internet & American Life Project Part 2. What people seek with search engines I just completed a course on the Operas of Giacommo Puccini. With the internet I was able to easily obtain his biography and a complete listing of all his works, various reviews of the pieces and as much detail as I wanted. All of this without leaving my desk and to obtain this when it was convenient to me. (without a search engine) I probably would have not bothered to obtain that information. Popular search terms show what is on Americans collective mind. The big search engines slice and dice their search logs and compile various lists of the most popular search terms. These lists give some sense of what is on America s collective mind, reflecting our shared culture, news, trends, events, and phenomena. Popular search terms always include a lot of seasonal references, current news, and pop culture. The search engines regularly omit terms relating to adult content from their lists. According to AskJeeves 4, the top searches for the week of Oct. 8, 2004 were online dictionary, music lyrics, games, halloween costumes, jokes, baby names, quotes, Britney spears, Paris Hilton, poems. Or from Yahoo 5 : Eminem, Britney Spears, Usher, Mt. St. Helens, Nelly, Register to Vote, Halloween costumes, Jo Jo, Paris Hilton, Green Day, NASCAR, Christina Aguilera, Hilary Duff, NFL, Linkin Park, Slipknot, Drudge Report, Alicia Keys, John Kerry, My Boo Or from the Lycos 50 6, from Oct. 2, 2004: Airline Flight Tracking, Clay Aiken, Paris, Hilton, Pamela Anderson, Halloween costumes, Britney Spears, Michelle Vieth, Halloween, NFL, poker, KaZaA, Brooke Burke, beheadings in Iraq, Christmas, Lindsay Lohan, Star Wars 3, The Olsen Twins, WWE. Dragonball, Baseball. All Time Hits: Searches for Britney Spears and Pamela Anderson have been on the Lycos top 50 list for 277 weeks in a row. And other search terms are the flashes in the pan, following events or news. In the week following the first of the presidential debates, John Kerry landed at Lycos s #36 spot, and George Bush made #40. They had not been on the list the previous week. Top searches of the year include some timeless classics and pop culture with real staying power. These have been in the top 100 from week to week during all of 2002: the Bible, Diablo II, Neopets, Tupac Shakur, The Beatles, Sailor Moon, The Simpsons, Carmen Electra, Oprah Winfrey, World War I, New York City, Final Fantasy, World War II Internet Searchers Pew Internet & American Life Project Part 2. What people seek with search engines Sometimes, search terms reflect extraordinary times when the whole world seems focused on a single thing. Lycos 50 published an unedited and an edited version of top hits to their web site between noon and midnight on Sept. 11, 2001: The unedited version: CNN, News, World Trade Center, CNN News, CNN.com, MSNBC, ABC News, BBC, Breaking News, World News. Iraq was Google s #7 search of the year for 2003, after Britney Spears, Harry Potter, Matrix, Shakira, David Beckham, 50 cent. And the edited version, which does not include news organizations: World Trade Center, Whitney Houston, Pentagon, World Trade Centre, Bin Laden World Trade Center New York, Osama Bin Laden, American Airlines, Camp David, Nostradamus. And Google s Zeitgeist archive gives a sense of the organic nature of search, showing what terms are gaining or losing popularity from week to week, or the popularity of search terms as they correlate with current news events. For example, when the space shuttle Columbia was lost over Texas in February of 2003, searches for NASA spiked for about a week. Beyond the popular search terms are the unique queries. Unique queries lie outside our collective culture, in our personal interests and problems, our individual work, our eccentric curiosities, and perhaps our miscellaneous misspellings and oddities. We get a glimpse of these unique terms, as they appear in the raw feed of search terms that users key in. These snapshots of the linguistic soup that a search engine processes are a reality check of the true hodgepodge that arrives at engines, without the benefit of neat packaging into organized lists. A sample from the MetaCrawler series 7 looks like this: klantgericht werken een voorbeeld turano bakery zip codes chicago miracle mile web based msn messenger free t3 and rhode island fibroid tumor fewmets 7 Internet Searchers Pew Internet & American Life Project Part 2. What people seek with search engines chief university of illinois food vw black majic pearl pneu egger footwear of the longago hospital beds + hydraulic pianobar fibroid tumor ferrari antietam que es gerente de proyectos straight-backed chair +stuhl hot4mo food ora free porn pics corn boiler heat united nations cafeteria government jobs ganesh image sexy lingerie dancewear cambrils lipitor a united golf balls robert youngson fsa obrien fax food check 21 chrissy hynde A broader user base and increased web content have altered the landscape of what we search for. In the earliest days of the internet and search engines, when the population of users was dominated by young men, two of the most popular search topics were sex and technology. Now, with the huge demographic expansion of the internet user population, their more diverse interests, and the vast growth of online content, the search landscape has changed. A recent study examining search trends finds the proportion of searches for especially sex and pornography has declined dramatically since 1997, while searches for the tamer topics of commerce and information have grown. 8 The study took search terms from logs of three popular search engines, AltaVista, AlltheWeb.com, and Excite, spanning , and organized them into categories. The following represents the categories from AltaVista in 2002: 8 Spink, Amanda and Bernard J. Jansen. Web Search: Public Searching of the Web. Springer Publishers, Internet Searchers Pew Internet & American Life Project Part 2. What people seek with search engines 1. People, places or things 2. Commerce, travel, employment, or economy 3. Computers or
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