Fraunhofer. Working Paper Sustainability and Innovation No. S 7/2007. Frank Sensfuß Mario Ragwitz Massimo Genoese - PDF

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Working Paper Sustainability and Innovation No. S 7/2007 Frank Sensfuß Mario Ragwitz Massimo Genoese The Merit-order effect: A detailed analysis of the price effect of renewable electricity generation

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Working Paper Sustainability and Innovation No. S 7/2007 Frank Sensfuß Mario Ragwitz Massimo Genoese The Merit-order effect: A detailed analysis of the price effect of renewable electricity generation on spot market prices in Germany ISI Fraunhofer Institute Systems and Innovation Research Abstract The German feed-in support of electricity generation from renewable energy sources has led to high growth rates of the supported technologies. Critics state that the costs for consumers are too high. An important aspect to be considered in the discussion is the price effect created by renewable electricity generation. This paper seeks to analyse the impact of privileged renewable electricity generation on the electricity market in Germany. The central aspect to be analysed is the impact of renewable electricity generation on spot market prices. The results generated by an agent-based simulation platform indicate that the financial volume of the price reduction is considerable. In the short run, this gives rise to a distributional effect which creates savings for the demand side by reducing generator profits. In the case of the year 2006, the volume of the merit-order effect exceeds the volume of the net support payments for renewable electricity generation which have to be paid by consumers. Table of Contents 1 Introduction Methodology Results Sensitivity analysis Fuel prices Capacity Scarcity mark-up CO 2 prices The impact of the power plant portfolio Comparison with the literature Conclusions Literature...22 Tables Table 1: Price-effect and total volume of the merit-order effect... 7 Table 2: Sensitivity Analysis for the year Table 3: Table 4: Impact of growing renewable electricity generation on the merit-order effect Impact of growing renewable electricity generation on the merit-order effect Table 5: Sensitivity analysis of the scarcity mark-up Table 6: Impact of CO 2 prices on the merit-order effect Table 7: Simplified power plant portfolio Table 8: Mothballed capacity Table 9: Decommissioned capacity in the period Table 10: Additional capacity Table 11: Comparison of the results for the merit-order effect Figures Figure 1: Merit-order effect of renewable electricity generation... 3 Figure 2: The impact of renewable generation on market prices in different segments on electricity demand... 5 Figure 3: Comparison of load and prices for one simulated day in October 2006 (two scenarios: one including EEG- Renewables, the other excluding EEG-Renewables)... 6 Figure 4: The impact of coal and gas prices on the supply curve Figure 5: Merit-order curve of the simplified power system Figure 6: Slope of the merit-order curve Figure 7: The effect of a dynamic power plant portfolio on the meritorder effect... 15 The Merit-order effect 1 1 Introduction The development of renewable electricity generation in Germany has been characterized by considerable growth rates throughout the past 15 years. This development is mainly driven by a guaranteed feed-in-tariff which has been in place since The actual conditions of the German support scheme were revised in 1998, 2000 and 2004 (see also Laubner, Metz, 2004; Wustenhagen, Bilharz, 2006). Since 2000 the Renewable Energy Sources Act is in place. According to the law the German grid operators have to buy electricity generated by specified renewable energy sources at a guaranteed feed-in-tariff. In a second step the electricity is sold to the electricity suppliers according to their market-share. The additional cost for the feed-in-tariff has to be paid by the consumers in the end. There is a considerable debate on the efficiency and the cost of the renewable support scheme. Publications on international level on the analysis of cost and efficiency of different support schemes on the European level (Ragwitz et al., 2007; Huber et al., 2004) and the United States (Palmer, Burtraw, 2005) show that this discussion is not only a German phenomenon. As a consequence of the continuous growth of supported renewable electricity generation in Germany from 18.1 TWh to ca. 52 TWh per year in the period of the payments for the feed-in-tariff rose according to the association of German grid operators from 1.6 billion Euro to 5.6 billion per year (Verband der Netzbetreiber [VDN], 2007). Additional aspects are necessary extensions of the grid and the increased demand for system services. However, recent studies show that the additional cost for these aspects are within the range of 1-10 Euro per MWh of renewable electricity generation which equals ca million Euro in the year (Auer et al., 2006; Klobasa, Ragwitz, 2006). But the electricity generated by renewable energy sources also has a value which has to be taken into account in the current discussion. Leaving minor aspects like necessary grid extensions and the increased demand for system services (Deutsche Energie-Agentur [DENA], 2005) aside the additional costs of the support from a consumer perspective could be defined by the feed-in-tariff minus the market value of the renewable electricity. An estimation of the market value of the renewable electricity generation can be calculated by multiplying the electricity production by the spot market price. Based on the market prices and the volume of the renewable electricity generation the market value of the generated renewable electricity can be estimated to ca. 2.5 billion Euro, almost 45% of the support payments. In another recent study which takes electricity trades on future markets into account the market value of renewable electricity generation is estimated to 44 Euro/MWh (Wenzel, Diekmann, 2006) or 2.3 2 The Merit-order effect billion Euro. The rising fuel prices and the introduction of the European emission trading system have lead to an heavy increase electricity prices was not foreseen in the future markets (European Energy Exchange [EEX], 2007a). This aspect leads to slight differences for the estimation of the market value. In addition the electricity generated by renewable energy sources also has an impact on the market prices itself. The central contribution of this paper to the current discussion of renewable support schemes is the analysis of this interaction. A stylized overview of the discussed effects of renewable electricity generation for a single hour is given in Figure 1. Thereby it is assumed that the electricity demand is inelastic in the short-term perspective of a day-ahead market. Since the electricity generated by renewable energy sources has to be bought by supply companies in advance the remaining demand load that has to be purchased on the electricity markets is reduced correspondingly. Therefore the guaranteed feed-in of electricity generated by renewable energy sources has the effect of a reduction in the electricity demand. In the picture the German merit-order-curve, which is a step function of single plant units in the real world, is simplified as a linear supply-curve. As long as this supply curve has a positive slope the reduced demand on the markets leads to lower prices. As this effect shifts market prices along the German merit-order of power plants this effect is called merit-order-effect in this paper. A central goal of this paper is to assess the actual value of the merit-effect of German renewable electricity generation in the period Another important interaction of renewable electricity generation is the interaction with the European emission trading system. A discussion of the interrelation of the German feed-in-support for renewable electricity generation and the European emission trading system can be found in recent publications (Rathmann, 2007; Walz, 2005). Future work will have to take this aspect into account. In addition to the value of the electricity generated by renewable energy sources the supported electricity generation also has an impact on the market price itself. The main goal of this section is the analysis of this interaction. An overview of the discussed effects of renewable electricity generation is given in Figure 1 for a single hour. It is assumed that the electricity demand is inelastic in the short-term perspective of a day-ahead market. Since the electricity generated by renewable energy sources has to be bought by supply companies in advance, the remaining demand load that has to be purchased on the electricity markets is reduced correspondingly. Therefore, the guaranteed feed-in of electricity generated by renewable energy sources have the effect of a reduced electricity demand. In the diagram the German merit-order curve is depicted as The Merit-order effect 3 a step function. As long as this supply curve has a positive slope, the reduced demand on the markets leads to lower prices. As this effect shifts market prices along the German merit-order of power plants, this effect is called the meritorder effect in this paper. A central goal of this section is to assess the actual value of the merit-order effect of German renewable electricity generation in the year Figure 1: Merit-order effect of renewable electricity generation D 2 D 1 S Price in Euro/MWh Merit-order effect Market value of P 1 P 2 renewables D=Demand P=Price S=Supply Demand in MW P 1 -P 2 = P Merit-order effect Source: own illustration Since electricity demand and renewable electricity generation vary on an hourly basis, an estimation of the actual value of the merit-order effect is far more complex than the estimation of the market value. Therefore the analysis is carried out using the PowerACE Cluster System which is able to simulate hourly spot market prices. 4 The Merit-order effect 2 Methodology In order to determine the impact of renewable electricity generation the calibrated PowerACE model is used to simulate electricity market prices in the years 2001 and A detailed description of the PowerACE model can be found in (Sensfuß, 2007, Genoese et al., 2007). The model provides a detailed representation of the German electricity sector. The model simulates reserve markets and the spot market. The spot market prices are calculated on hourly level for an entire year. Based on a price prognosis power plants and pump storage plants are bid into reserve markets and the spot market. For the given simulation the bid price for power plants is based on variable cost and start up cost. Demand and renewable load are bid with price inelastic bids into the market. Thereby it is assumed that the entire electricity demand is traded at the simulated spot market. This assumption deviates form the real world situation in two ways: 1. In the real world situation only ca. 89 TWh or 16.5 % of the electricity demand were traded on the spot market in 2006 European Energy Exchange [EEX], 2007b. It can be assumed that an important amount of electricity is traded in bilateral contracts which are likely to be less volatile than the spot market. 2. The simulated spot market prices are based on fundamental data. Therefore prices are less volatile than real world market prices. It is not likely that peak prices of several hundred Euro/MWh at the real spot market represent a good price signal for the entire electricity demand in a given hour. Under the given assumption that the entire electricity demand is traded at the resulting market prices it seems to be adequate to base the analysis on the more conservative price development of the simulated market prices. In case of renewable electricity generation the electricity generation is calculated based on given hourly load profiles. The resulting electricity production may differ from published production data due to the fact that the capacity available at the end of the year is assumed to be producing for the entire year according to the technology specific utilization. All other parameters are held constant. In order to determine the impact of renewable electricity generation on the electricity market the simulation is run 50 times. The resulting time series is calculated as average of the simulation runs in order to level out variations caused by the random generator used to simulate The Merit-order effect 5 power plant outages. In a second step the same procedure is applied to 50 simulation runs without renewable electricity production supported by the feed-in tariff. Since the development of large hydro plants has not yet been affected by the renewable support scheme, electricity production of large hydro plants is taken into account in both simulation settings. The following analysis compares both time series. 3 Results A comparison of a selected day in October 2006 is given in Figure 3. The figure shows the impact of renewable electricity generation supported by the EEG on the remaining system load that has to be covered by conventional power plants. The load of renewable electricity generation in the selected period varies between 4.4 GW and 14.7 GW. But its impact on prices varies even more. During hours of low load the reduction of the market price is 0 Euro/MWh while it reaches up to 36 Euro/MWh in hours of peak demand. This difference in the impact on market prices is caused by the different slope or step size of the German merit-order curve in different load segments of the electricity demand. The slope of the German merit-order is higher in cases of high demand. This effect is illustrated in a stylized way in Figure 2. Figure 2: The impact of renewable generation on market prices in different segments on electricity demand Price in Euro/MWh Supply Curve price price Renewable Generation Capacity in MW Source: own illustration 6 The Merit-order effect Figure 3: Comparison of load and prices for one simulated day in October 2006 (two scenarios: one including EEG-Renewables, the other excluding EEG-Renewables) 90,000 80,000 Incl. EEG Excl. EEG Load in MW 70,000 60,000 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10, Hour of day Incl. EEG Excl. EEG Price in Euro/MWh Hour of day Source: own illustration Based on the assumption that the entire electricity demand of a single hour is purchased at the corresponding spot market price the volume of the merit-order effect can be calculated. If the difference is summed up according to Formula 3-1, the absolute volume of the merit-order effect can be estimated. The results for the years 2001, 2004, 2005 and 2006 are presented in Table 1. The results indicate a considerable reduction of the average market price of The Merit-order effect Euro/MWh in the year In total the volume of the merit-order effect reaches its highest value in the year 2006 with about 4.98 billion Euro. Another interesting indicator for the discussion of the actual cost of renewable electricity support from the consumer perspective is the ratio of the merit-order effect and the electricity generated by renewable energy sources (Formula 3-2). This indicator allows a comparison to the average specific tariff for renewable electricity of 109 Euro/MWh in 2006 (Verband der Netzbetreiber [VDN], 2007). This indicator reaches 95.4 Euro/MWh in the year Formula 3-1: Calculation of the annual financial volume of the merit-order effect v = = = h 8760 h 1 ( x p ) d h h h Legend: Variables Unit Indices d = Total electricity demand [MWh] h = Hour p = Price including renewable generation [Euro/MWh] x = Price excluding renewable generation [Euro/MWh] v = Total volume of the merit-order effect [Euro] Formula 3-2: Calculation of the specific value of the merit-order effect v s = r Legend: Variables Unit Indices r = Renewable electricity generation [MWh] s = Specific value of the merit-order effect [Euro/MWh] v = Volume of the merit-order effect [Euro] Table 1: Price-effect and total volume of the merit-order effect1 Simulated renewable generation Average price reduction Volume merit-order effect Merit-order effect per renewable MWh Average feed-in tariff Year TWh /MWh Billion /MWh /MWh The volume of the renewable electricity generation deviates slightly from the published data (see also Verband der Netzbetreiber [VDN], 2007). This effect is caused by the fact that the model settings assume that the renewable electricity generation capacity at the end of a year is available for the entire year. 8 The Merit-order effect 4 Sensitivity analysis An analysis of the development of the volume of the merit-order effect shows that the effect is not only influenced by the growth of renewable electricity generation. The main driving factors for the level of the merit-order effect are the installed capacity of renewable electricity generation, the development of fuel prices and the CO 2 price. In total 42 scenarios with 50 simulation runs are carried out for the sensitivity analysis of the year The total amount of 2100 simulation runs leads to extensive requirements in terms of computing power, data handling and data storage since the produced data for this analysis amounts to ca. 20 GB. 4.1 Fuel prices In order to analyse the impact of changes to the fuel prices, the merit-order effect is determined for simulation runs with different fuel prices. Thereby simulations are run with a price increase and decrease of 20 % for each fuel the results are shown in Table 2. Table 2: Sensitivity Analysis for the year 2006 Fuel prices Relative change merit-order effect 2006 low normal high low high /MWh /MWh /MWh % % Nuclear Hard coal Lignite Oil Gas The sensitivity analysis for the year 2006 shows that the fuel prices for lignite and nuclear power plants only have a very low impact on the value of the meritorder effect. Despite the spread of +/- 20 % in the fuel cost the fuel price only influences the value of the merit-order effect by a maximum of 2 %. This result is not surprising as the base load power plants are largely unaffected by the development of renewable electricity generation up to 2006 due to the fact that they are rarely replaced by renewable electricity generation. In case of fuel oil the sensitivity analysis for fuel oil shows only a very low impact on the value of the merit-order effect. A 20 % lower fuel price decreases The Merit-order effect 9 the value of the merit-order effect by 2 % while the higher oil price increases the merit-order effect by 1 %. The low sensitivity can be explained by the low importance of oil fired power plants in the German electricity supply. Since the number of plants is low, they only set the market price in rare cases. The analysis of the variation of the gas price shows the highest impact on the result. A reduction of the gas price by 20 % leads to a reduction change of the merit-order effect of ca. 30 %. The disproportionately high effect of a variation of the gas price on the volume of the merit-order effect can be explained by the impact of the gas price on the generation cost. The gas turbines for peak demand have a lower efficiency, which makes the generation cost more sensitive towards higher fuel prices. Since gas fired units set the prices in most hours of peak demand, the effect is not levelled out by scheduling another generation technology. Another important factor with an influence on the result is the hard coal price. A 20 % variation of the fuel price leads to an opposite effect of 9 % and 11 % on the volume of the merit-order effect. At first sight this result is striking, but the analysis shows that the result is not only influenced by a single fuel price or the general price level of fuel prices. An important factor influencing the results is the ratio of gas and coal prices. The strong dependency of the effect to the ratio gas and coal prices can be explained by the German merit-order curve. Price setting units are mostly coal and gas power plants. In hours of lower electricity demand the price is set by hard coal units and in hours of high demand the price is set by gas units. Therefore higher hard coal prices reduce the slope of the merit-order curve, thus reducing the merit-order effect. Very high coal prices and lower gas prices decrease the slope of the supply as depicted in Figure 4. 10 The Merit-order e
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