Defects in Housing, Musikbyen Olsen, Ib Steen; Bertelsen, Niels Haldor; Frandsen, Anne Kathrine; Haugbølle, Kim - PDF

Description
Aalborg Universitet Defects in Housing, Musikbyen Olsen, Ib Steen; Bertelsen, Niels Haldor; Frandsen, Anne Kathrine; Haugbølle, Kim Publication date: 2010 Document Version Submitted manuscript Link to

Please download to get full document.

View again

of 27
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Information
Category:

Book

Publish on:

Views: 6 | Pages: 27

Extension: PDF | Download: 0

Share
Transcript
Aalborg Universitet Defects in Housing, Musikbyen Olsen, Ib Steen; Bertelsen, Niels Haldor; Frandsen, Anne Kathrine; Haugbølle, Kim Publication date: 2010 Document Version Submitted manuscript Link to publication from Aalborg University Citation for published version (APA): Olsen, I. S., Bertelsen, N. H., Frandsen, A. K., & Haugbølle, K. (2010). Defects in Housing, Musikbyen: Danish Building Defects Fund (BSF) CREDIT Case DK08. Hørsholm: SBI forlag. (SBi 2010; No. 27). General rights Copyright and moral rights for the publications made accessible in the public portal are retained by the authors and/or other copyright owners and it is a condition of accessing publications that users recognise and abide by the legal requirements associated with these rights.? Users may download and print one copy of any publication from the public portal for the purpose of private study or research.? You may not further distribute the material or use it for any profit-making activity or commercial gain? You may freely distribute the URL identifying the publication in the public portal? Take down policy If you believe that this document breaches copyright please contact us at providing details, and we will remove access to the work immediately and investigate your claim. Downloaded from vbn.aau.dk on: March 11, 2017 SBi 2010:27 Defects in Housing, Musikbyen Danish Building Defects Fund (BSF) CREDIT Case DK08 Defects in Housing, Musikbyen Danish Building Defects Fund (BSF) CREDIT Case DK08 Ib Steen Olsen Niels Haldor Bertelsen Anne Kathrine Frandsen Kim Haugbølle SBi 2010:27 Danish Building Research Institute, Aalborg University 2010 Title Defects in Housing, Musikbyen Subtitle Danish Building Defects Fund (BSF). CREDIT case DK08 Serial title SBi 2010:27 Edition 1 edition Year 2010 Authors Ib Steen Olsen, Niels Haldor Bertelsen, Anne Kathrine Frandsen, Kim Haugbølle Language English Pages 22 References Page 22 Key words Defects in housing, Danish Building Defects Fund, Musikbyen, Byggeskadefonden ISBN Cover Publisher Byggeskadefonden Statens Byggeforskningsinstitut Danish Building Research Institute, Aalborg University Dr. Neergaards Vej 15, DK-2970 Hørsholm Extracts may be reproduced but only with reference to source: Olsen, I. S. et al. (2010). Defects in Housing, Musikbyen. Danish Building Defects Fund (BSF). CREDIT Case DK08 (SBi 2010:27). Hørsholm: Danish Building Research Institute, Aalborg University. Contents Contents...3 Preface...4 Summary Introduction Objectives and work packages of CREDIT Background, purpose and focus of the case study Research design and methods applied in the case study Reading instruction Buildings assessments in construction or real estate processes The actual building, building parts and processes The applied assessment methods and tools in the processes Cost and performance indicators applied in the assessments Relation to different enterprises and national benchmarking Visions for future improvements Enterprises assessments and indicators internally applied The actual enterprise, company and firm Assessment methods and tools applied in the enterprise Costs and performance indicators applied in the enterprise Relation to building cases and national benchmarking Visions and innovation for future improvements National benchmarking indicators, assessment and organisation The actual benchmarking organization and its purpose Assessment applied in the benchmarking organization Cost and performance indicators applied in benchmarking Relation to enterprises, building projects and real estate Visions and innovation for future improvements Discussions and conclusions Buildings lessons learned and recommendations Enterprises - lessons learned and recommendations National benchmarking - lessons learned and recommendations...19 References Preface This report describes the results of a case study undertaken as part of the Nordic/Baltic project CREDIT: Construction and Real Estate Developing Indicators for Transparency. The case study is part of the work in work package 4-6 with respect to project assessment tools, application in firms and national benchmarking systems. CREDIT includes the most prominent research institutes within benchmarking and performance indicators in construction and real estate, namely SBi/AAU (Denmark), VTT (Finland), Lund University (Sweden) and SINTEF (Norway). Further, three associated partners have joined CREDIT. The three associated partners are the Icelandic Center for Innovation (Iceland), Tallinn University of Technology (Estonia) and Vilnius Gediminas Technical University (Lithuania). The project has been managed by a steering committee consisting of the following persons: Kim Haugbølle, SBi/AAU (project owner). Niels Haldor Bertelsen, SBi/AAU (project coordinator) Pekka Huovila, VTT. Päivi Hietanen, Senate Properties Ole Jørgen Karud, SINTEF. Magnus Hvam, SKANSKA. Bengt Hansson, Lund University. Kristian Widén, Lund University. The project group wishes to thank our industrial partners and all the contributors to the case studies. In particular, the project group wishes to thank the four Nordic funding agencies that sponsored the project as part of the ERABUILD collaborative research funding scheme: The Nordic Innovation Centre (NICe), TEKES in Finland, FORMAS in Sweden and the Danish Enterprise and Construction Authority (Erhvervs- og Byggestyrelsen) in Denmark. Danish Building Research Institute, Aalborg University Department of Construction and Health August 2010 Niels-Jørgen Aagaard Research director 4 Summary This case study has been chosen: To show how deficiencies and building damages can be registered one year and five years after the construction has been completed and handed over. To analyse the extent of the cost of repairing work. To explore how experiences from inspections of finished buildings can be utilized in new construction and as benchmarking. The Danish Building Defects Fund is the primary source of information on the building quality of Danish non profit housing. The Fund is an independent organization, which was established by law in 1986 as part of a quality and liability reform the same year. Further information can be found on Since 1986 it has been obligatory for new housing with public financial support to register at the Fund and pay 1 % of the building costs including site costs to the Fund. A part of the payment is used for inspections one year and five years after handing over. The rest is an insurance concerning defects. Buildings (WP4) summary The inspections are executed in accordance with a general classification of the different parts of a building. They are the indicators. When a deficiency or a building damage is observed, the actual part is therefore also marked. The Fund has furthermore established a classification of the seriousness of a deficiency or a building damage with a division into five categories. The indicators are the starting point to show whether there are or could be problems with indicators at higher levels as indoor environment ( as safety and indoor climate) and product performance (as constructions and installations). Enterprises (WP5) summary The indicators are used, as described, when an independent company execute an inspection after hand over. In this way they are not used in the planning or construction of the actual project. But they are used in eventually repair work and in the operation of the building. And due to the dissemination of information and the rules for the obligatory quality assurance they are part of the planning and execution of coming projects. With one year and five year inspections after hand over it has been possible to establish a rapid and effective feedback of knowledge and experiences concerning building methods, components and materials. National benchmarking (WP6) summary The purpose off the Fund is: To carry out the one year and five year building inspections To give financial support to the repair of building defects To communicate findings and experiences about the building process and building to the building sector for the purpose of preventing future buildings defects and to promote quality and efficiency in building. 5 The information about the quality of housing projects is available in the Fund s extensive database. The database includes all information collected from systematic five year building inspections, which were established in After 1998 a one year building inspection was established. The information collected here is also stored in the database, and are accessible for the public on The Fund has carried out inspections of approximately buildings with approximately dwellings in all since The building inspections register for all parts of the building, which are essential for the lifetime of the building, whether the building part is in accordance with laws, regulations and likely, or if there is defect or damage. For example all building parts concerning the climate protection are registered, while for instance indoor equipment is not registered, because it has no influence on the lifetime of the building. Approximately 250 independent firms, consultants (architects and engineers) and other (i.e. contractors) carry out the buildings inspections throughout the country. The same firms are involved in planning, supervision and execution of publicly subsided housing but of cause they do not carry out inspections of houses, in which they have taken part in the building. The Fund covers up to 95% of the expenditures for damage repairs, that are claimed at the latest 20 years after hand over has taken place. After acknowledgement of a building damage, the Fund make liability claims to the responsible builder, consultants, contractors and suppliers as far as are possible. The Fund has developed an extensive statistic about defects in housing, which is disseminated to the industry and clients. The statistic is organized in accordance with different aspects as client (with concrete name), building parts after the classification and seriousness and involved companies (with names). If necessary the Fund will also publish warnings about specific methods, components or materials. Some examples are problems with stability of buildings, use of specific bricks and cement slates and roofs with light underroofing. It is estimated that dissemination of information has reduced repair costs by at least 100 million DDK per year. The number of estates with defects has been reduced from about 30 % to about 4 %. In 2008 the Danish Parliament issued a law concerning private housing in accordance with which it is obligatory for a developer or contractor to sign an insurance concerning possible defects in new dwellings. The law is based on experiences from the Fund, and the Fund is also involved in disseminating knowledge and experiences from this arrangement in order to prevent future buildings defects and to promote quality and efficiency in this type of buildings. 6 1. Introduction This chapter describes the objectives of the CREDIT project, the background, scope and purpose of the case study of search engines for private homes, and the research design of the study. 1.1 Objectives and work packages of CREDIT Sir Winston Churchill once said, We shape our buildings, afterwards our buildings shape us (28 th Oct 1943). This quotation underlines how strong a building can influence an occupier or a user. Providing complex public facilities for example hospitals, schools, universities and libraries that are able to meet both the internal and external stakeholders needs and requirements is not without complications. The aims and demands of different stakeholders within a project can sometimes create conflict with each other s interest. Understanding the needs and requirements of these stakeholders are essential to remain competitive in today s market. A client that pays attention to the needs of the end-users will be rewarded with a high-performance property. Simultaneously, this shift seeks to solve many ills associated with inadequate building conditions and resulting in poor building function. Due to the amount of both public and private money being invested in delivering public and private facilities, strong actions must be adopted. Collaboration with the relevant stakeholders will help building owners in identifying the required performance indicators to create high-performance facilities. The project aims to define a model for the implementation of performance requirements, which ensure the fulfilment of the various types of users and stakeholders needs and demands. The model shall also allow for the continuous measuring of the effectiveness of the used requirements and the model as such so that it may be improved as more knowledge and experience of it is achieved. Following the themes of the ERABUILD call closely, the aim of CREDIT is to improve transparency on value creation in real estate and construction. Thus, the objectives of CREDIT are: To capture end user needs and requirements in order to identify and quantify where possible value creation in real estate and construction. To develop compliance assessment and verification methods. To define and develop benchmarking methods and building performance indicators in real estate and construction. To set out recommendations for benchmarking internationally key building performance indicators. Consequently, the deliverables of CREDIT are: 1. The establishment of a network of Nordic and Baltic researchers for benchmarking and performance indicators through frequent interactions in workshops across the Nordic and Baltic countries. 2. A State-of-the-Art report, that will identify and critically examine a number of existing tools, databases, mandatory reporting, approaches and benchmarking schemes to capture and measure end-user needs, client and public requirements on performance and value creation. 7 3. A strategic management and decision making tool to guide the definition and development of benchmarking methods and building performance indicators in different business cases. 4. A comprehensive performance assessment and management tool with associated key performance indicators to capture end-user requirements and to continuously measure and verify the compliance of performance throughout the lifecycle of an actual building project and linked to building information models. 5. Recommendations as to how sectoral and/or national indexes for performance indicators can be designed in order to allow for international benchmarking of construction and real estate. 6. Dissemination of the lessons learned and tools developed through news articles, press releases, workshops with actors in the real estate and construction cluster etc. 1.2 Background, purpose and focus of the case study This case study has been chosen: To show how deficiencies and damages can be registered one year and five years after the construction has been completed and handed over. To analyse the extent of the cost of repairing work. To explore how experiences from inspections of finished buildings can be utilized in new construction and as benchmarking. The Fund, who is in charge of the inspections, has developed a classification of every part of a building and has also worked out a method for the evaluation of the seriousness of deficiencies with different levels. As Danish housing with public financial support normally is of a better quality compared too many other countries and without restrictions for different income groups this housing form here is called non profit housing and not social housing. 1.3 Research design and methods applied in the case study The case describes the inspections of a housing project one year and five years after handing over. The inspections are executed by an independent fund, the Building Defects Fund. The description is based on meetings with the Fund and written documentation for inspections in a housing estate, Musikbyen, and guidelines from the Fund and the Ministry of Interior and Social Affairs The case study has been written in collaboration between SBi, Ib Steen Olsen, and the Fund, Ole Bønnelycke. The case study has been conducted as an action research by researchers and members of the organization seeking to improve their situation (Greenwood and Levin, 1998) Data have been conducted from multiple sources to enhance reliability and trustworthiness of the results (Robson, 2002). 8 1.4 Reading instruction Chapter 2 in this report addresses issues relevant to WP4 on assessments at project level. Chapter 3 addresses issues relevant to WP5 on the application of assessments in firms. Chapter 4 addresses issues relevant to WP6 on sectoral, national or international benchmarking systems. Chapter 5 discusses and concludes on the lessons learned with respect to the three levels of projects, firms and systems. The work of each work package (WP) is documented in various other reports, articles etc. Below, a graphical illustration of the hierarchy and linkages between the individual reports is given. Figure 1. Graphical illustration of the hierarchy of the CREDIT reports......report level 1 CREDIT Report 6 CREDIT Summary and National Recom. WP2.....Report level 2. CREDIT Report 1 State-of-the-Art of Benchmarking WP3 CREDIT Rep ort 2 Nordic and Baltic Case Studies WP5 CREDIT Report 3 CREDIT Performance Indicator WP2 CREDIT Report 4 Project Assessment in Construction WP4 CREDIT Report 5 National and International Benchmarking WP6... Report level 3.. CREDIT casenn00 CREDIT Case Study Guideline CREDIT case DKx CREDIT zvbcxvzcvz case DK01 hjk,mnkhjl zvbcxv njmk,mnm zcvz hjk,mnkhjl njmk,mnm CREDIT case FIx CREDIT zvbcxvzcvz case FI01 hjk,mnkhjl zvbcxvzcvz njmk,mnm hjk,mnkhjl njmk,mnm CREDIT case NOx CREDIT zvbcxvzcvz case NO 01 hjk,mnkhjl zvbcxvzcvz njmk,mnm hjk,mnkhjl njmk,mnm CREDIT case SEx CREDIT zvbcxvzcvz case SE01 hjk,mnkhjl zvbcxvzcvz njmk,mnm hjk,mnkhjl njmk,mnm 9 2. Buildings assessments in construction or real estate processes The established indicators are one year after completion evaluated to detect deficiencies or building damages. And five years after the Fund will inspect, whether the deficiencies or building damages registered at the one year inspection have been eliminated and look at possible signs of damages from hidden deficiencies, which were not registered under the one year inspection. The results concerning the indicators are published and thereby used in coming new housing projects. 2.1 The actual building, building parts and processes The actual case study has focus on a non profit housing project one year and five years after handing over. The project consists of 25 dwellings and was designed and constructed in with handing over 23 April The client was a non profit housing organization Boligselskabet af 1943 in Næstved. The project was executed by the following companies: White arkitekter A/S as architect, Lyngkilde A/S as consulting engineer and by the following local contractors: carpenter: H. Nielsen & Søn, bricklayer: Murermester Peter Knudsen, foundations: FC Entreprise A/S, plumber: H. P. Christensen & Søn A/S and electrician: Ole s El-Service. The one year inspection was executed by Tegnestuen Steudel & Knudsen, architects, and the five year inspection by Friis Andersen, architect. Both firms were not involved in the design or the execution. The inspections are in general executed by a number of private companies, who are chosen after a prequalification. They have to take part in different meetings arranged by the Fund in order to disseminate experiences from inspections. 2.2 The applied assessment methods and tools in the processes The indicators are used, when an independent company executes an inspection after handing over. In this way they are not used in the planning or construction of the actual project. The results of the evaluations of the different indicators are meanwhile used in eventually repair
Related Search
Similar documents
View more...
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks